Famous Author's Fairfield County Home Hits Market

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The home at 23 King St. in Danbury, once the home of famous author Rose Wilder Lane, is up for sale.
The home at 23 King St. in Danbury, once the home of famous author Rose Wilder Lane, is up for sale. Photo Credit: Contributed
The home at 23 King St. in Danbury has a beautiful patio.
The home at 23 King St. in Danbury has a beautiful patio. Photo Credit: Contributed
A view of the spacious dining room with fireplace.
A view of the spacious dining room with fireplace. Photo Credit: Contributed
The sun room.
The sun room. Photo Credit: Contributed
One of the three bathrooms at 23 King St.
One of the three bathrooms at 23 King St. Photo Credit: Contributed
The home has four bedrooms.
The home has four bedrooms. Photo Credit: Contributed
A view of the meticulously maintained grounds at 23 King St. in Danbury.
A view of the meticulously maintained grounds at 23 King St. in Danbury. Photo Credit: Contributed

DANBURY, Conn. -- The Danbury home of well-known author Rose Wilder Lane recently went on the market in the highly coveted King Street neighborhood.

The home at 23 King St. is listed for $450,000 by Demaree Cooney of ERA Goodfellows Home Real Estate. The four-bedroom, three-bathroom home includes 3,505 square feet of space. Complete details are on the listing website.

The home has a unique history. Lane was the daughter of Laura Ingalls Wilder (author of “Little House on the Prairie”) and her husband, Almanzo. Lane was also a gifted writer, and worked as a journalist for the San Francisco Bulletin before becoming a freelance writer. Her articles appeared in The Saturday Evening Post, Ladies Home Journal, Good Housekeeping and more.

Lane moved to Danbury in 1938, and shared her experiences in remodeling the home with Woman’s Day magazine. Later on, she became one of the leaders of the American libertarian movement along with Ayn Rand and Isabel Patterson.

According to a profile by Chris Woodside, Lane spent a lot of her time in Danbury, returning to her South Dakota farming roots. “Lane herself spent less time writing and more time returning to her farming roots — this time as a political statement. In protest of President Roosevelt’s New Deal programs, especially Social Security, during World War II she nearly stopped writing, refused a ration card, and farmed and canned produce on her land,'' Woodside said.

Lane died in 1968.

The home, built in 1879, has aged well. The 10-room Colonial has three fireplaces, eat-in kitchen, dining room, French doors to the living room, balcony and patio. There is also a library, a light and bright sunroom and gorgeous views of the property.

The grounds have been meticulously maintained and landscaped, and includes a waterfall which cascades into the koi pond.

For more information, contact Cooney at 203-798-9000, ext. 211 or at 203-417-0304. She can also be reached at Demaree.Cooney@era.com

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